Parenting for the Launch What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18
---

Career Readiness Essentials: Knowing What Employers Value

3/13/2017 3:18:52 PM

Here’s a true story from my hometown. She was scheduled to arrive for work as a server for a small family restaurant at 5:00. However, she apparently received a better offer. At 4:55 she called the owner, informing him that she was sick and unable to work. But, merely 15 minutes later, she would be posting pictures of herself with friends at a beach party some seven miles away. When she showed up refreshed for work the next day, she was fired on the spot.
 
This case example is worth sharing in your homes and classrooms because, in various forms, stories like this are becoming commonplace. Whether from inexperience, lack of training, or simply misguided attitudes, many teens and young adults are struggling on the job. They’re learning the hard way that trophies, so easy to come by when they were young, are much more difficult to obtain in the workplace. But, with proper training, stories like this are preventable.
 
In last week’s installment in our career readiness series, we discussed the importance of self awareness as the necessary first step to a successful career. Finding a good match begins with knowing me!  Now, in the second step, I need to get to know you: my current or potential employer. But, judging from the horror stories I hear, employer perspectives are a missing ingredient in many career readiness programs. Students need to understand that their career success involves much more than smarts and skills.
 
To this end, here is our top ten list of qualities desired by employers:
  1.      Integrity: adherence to moral and ethical principles; trustworthiness 
  2.      High standards: a commitment to excellence in work, relationships, and attitudes; actively seeks out feedback and professional development
  3.      Reliability: dependable in fulfilling responsibilities; adopts an “on time, every time, with excellence” mentality
  4.      Motivation/work ethic: self starter who is willing to go “above and beyond;” industrious and efficient and follows instructions
  5.      Team player/relational skill: demonstrates positive interpersonal skills with fellow employees, clients, prospects, suppliers, and the community; encourages others and focuses on the company and team over self
  6.      Positive attitude/enthusiasm: displays a constructive and uplifting attitude and passion for both work and the company
  7.      Innovative: demonstrates curiosity, creativity, and a commitment to improve processes, products, and services
  8.      Resilience: faces challenges head on, rebounds from adversity, and resolves conflict along the way
  9.      Professional manner: displays a professional attitude, appearance, and communication
  10.      Commitment: is loyal to the company's mission and core values and represents the company will in the community
 
Whether we’re parents, educators, or mentors, it’s vital that we train the next generation with these guiding principles. While doing so, here are some important things to keep in mind:
  • Help them understand that they are there to serve the company, not the other way around. Disabuse them of any sense of entitlement or notion that the world revolves around them.
  • The time to begin modeling these qualities is NOW. Have your students rank themselves on a 1-5 scale. For which qualities are they a 5-star role model? Where do they need to up their game?
  • Through role-playing exercises, have your students pretend they are the owner of a company recruiting for a new position. What qualities would they be emphasizing as they evaluate candidates? By switching them from their usual subservient role to that of the boss, they will quickly appreciate the employer’s perspective.
 
Once students appreciate the importance of these workplace qualities, they will be better equipped for their entire career management process. That means better cover letters, resumes, applications, interviews, and on-the-job performance. Understanding the qualities valued by employers should be an integral part of your career training efforts. It would have certainly helped avoid a fiasco in my hometown! 


Tagged as: career readiness, parenting, teens, career, success, employers, interview, summer jobs, teaching, millennials, job search, college, parenting for the launch, FCCLA

---
Permalink | Leave a Comment (0 Comments) | Print Blog Post

Comments On


Please leave your comments for Career Readiness Essentials: Knowing What Employers Value.







Click here for Bulk Orders

Schedule Dennis to Speak at your Event or Organization

Television Interview





What People are Saying

Welcome New Partners!


Email Dennis Trittin

Friend Dennis on FacebookFollow Dennis on Twitter