Parenting for the Launch What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18 What I Wish I Knew at 18
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Indonesia, Here We Come!

7/28/2012 8:55:27 AM

When I wrote What I Wish I Knew at 18, I was hopeful that its message had global appeal. But, like any author, you put your work out there for all the world to see, having no clue whether this would ever become a reality—especially for an upstart self publisher!
 
Imagine my surprise, then, when a global educational consultant specializing in Asia, Gaylord Anderson, urgently invited me in January to his home. (A friend had given him a copy of our works and, after his review, he had a BIG idea to share.) After describing his background of training teachers around the world and his love of, and expertise in, Indonesia, he boldly stated that our leadership program is exactly what the country has been looking for. And, he wanted to help make it happen!
 
For the next few months, Gaylord strategically handed out his limited quantities of books and guides to Indonesian leaders in the business, education, faith, and media communities. In each case, their feedback was overwhelming. They asked if he could convince the author to offer this work in their country. 
 
Encouraged by their comments, Gaylord “happened” to see an area publisher’s sign on a walk from his hotel and he stopped in to meet the president. “You must read this work and see for yourself whether this should be published in Indonesia,” he stressed. A week later, their answer was “yes,” and they wanted to be the ones to do it.
 
Ten days later, I received a proposal to co-publish our work from the president of Kesaint Blanc Publishing, Laura Prinsloo, who was effusive about the opportunity for these resources to impact her country. It was clearly meant to be. In a few months, a wonderful partnership has grown between LifeSmart Publishing and Kesaint Blanc Publishing. It couldn’t have gone any better…despite tight deadlines and creating English and Bahasa language versions of our resources before August!
 
Tonight I leave for the adventure of my lifetime—my first trip to Indonesia to officially launch our work at major conferences and workshops throughout the country! I’ll be meeting with major dignitaries in the education, business, media, and faith communities, spreading this universal message of honorable leadership to a country that’s hungry for it. I’ll also meet with parents and young people at my various talks, seeing firsthand the warmth of a people I’ve heard so much about.
 
What a blessing it’s been to see this completely unexpected opportunity unfold and to make such great new friends across the globe. Sure, I’m a little nervous, but I know I’m in great hands…both from above and at the airport in Indonesia who will be there to welcome me.
 
Hello Indonesia! See you in a bit!


Tagged as: LifeSmart Publishing, What I Wish I Knew at 18, Indonesia, Kesaint Blanc Publishing, teacher training, Asia

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Comments On Indonesia, Here We Come!

Dyah - 8/4/2012 10:21:35 PM
Hi Dennis, hope to see you @america on Monday, 6 August 2012.

Junita - 8/11/2012 12:37:00 AM
Hi Dennis.., this morning i listened Smart FM radio, one of my favourite radio. Were replay ayah edi section. I felt touchable and fully thanks to you and your team specially to Smart FM. Not many people concern and humbly take this vision, i see you have heart on doing it. I pray God bless you and your family and keep spread your message to the world. Hope to see you one day.

Reply by Dennis Trittin - 8/16/2012 10:12:19 AM
Hi Junita!
Thanks for your encouraging words! We had a wonderful time with Edy! He's amazing and we both felt so unified in our missions. I hope to see you one day too! Looks like I will return to Indonesia, perhaps as soon as January.
Blessings to you from America!
Come - 8/28/2012 5:13:39 AM
I think you are right! And I know I have felt completely alone at times in wanintg to see school-aged children treat each other with acceptance and tolerance. When a fellow mom working with me in one of my children's kindergarten classrooms years ago told me her son was super competitive, I thought she was apologizing. But over the years that followed, I watched in disbelief as she encouraged her son to only win-at all costs: rough play and fouls on the soccer field, cheating in class. And in my daughters kindergarten class, a mean girl with a superior-minded mom transfered mid-year into the school district. It was like night and day before they transfered and after they arrived! The mood was upbeat before. And fear and mean-hearted games were obvious within one week after! The mom promptly ran for and won a seat on the school board. This mother/daughter team then carved up the entire population of girls in the grade between a cruel and exclusive group who actually believed they were above the school staff and a secondary larger group of want-to-bes. With this social structure in place, the entire female population of the grade would target one girl at a time until they broke her. By the time this group reached sixth grade, 5 of the families pulled their girls out of the school, and the staff and PTA formed an anti-bullying task force. It failed because the girls believed they were above it all. I think the problem gets worse when moms who encourage exclusionary play come on campus to volunteer without getting a clear message from the school and teacher about the way the students are expected to treat each other. So many moms on campus is so great, but can also create the potential for the unofficial social messages they may bring to become a contributing factor to the meanness that is becoming more frequent in school. Social curriculum should teach and enforce empathy. This may be the only way to teach parents how to teach, or at least mimic a more acceptable behavior. Thank you for your voice!

Reply by Dennis Trittin - 8/30/2012 4:37:00 PM
I have heard stories like this becoming more common...sometimes the parents are the true culprits rather than the students. Administrators have to be attentive to that and Boards supportive of the Administrators when this happens. I wish the situation was different, but parents need to confront other parents when this sort of thing happens.
Come - 8/28/2012 5:13:39 AM
I think you are right! And I know I have felt completely alone at times in wanintg to see school-aged children treat each other with acceptance and tolerance. When a fellow mom working with me in one of my children's kindergarten classrooms years ago told me her son was super competitive, I thought she was apologizing. But over the years that followed, I watched in disbelief as she encouraged her son to only win-at all costs: rough play and fouls on the soccer field, cheating in class. And in my daughters kindergarten class, a mean girl with a superior-minded mom transfered mid-year into the school district. It was like night and day before they transfered and after they arrived! The mood was upbeat before. And fear and mean-hearted games were obvious within one week after! The mom promptly ran for and won a seat on the school board. This mother/daughter team then carved up the entire population of girls in the grade between a cruel and exclusive group who actually believed they were above the school staff and a secondary larger group of want-to-bes. With this social structure in place, the entire female population of the grade would target one girl at a time until they broke her. By the time this group reached sixth grade, 5 of the families pulled their girls out of the school, and the staff and PTA formed an anti-bullying task force. It failed because the girls believed they were above it all. I think the problem gets worse when moms who encourage exclusionary play come on campus to volunteer without getting a clear message from the school and teacher about the way the students are expected to treat each other. So many moms on campus is so great, but can also create the potential for the unofficial social messages they may bring to become a contributing factor to the meanness that is becoming more frequent in school. Social curriculum should teach and enforce empathy. This may be the only way to teach parents how to teach, or at least mimic a more acceptable behavior. Thank you for your voice!


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